Grade 5

Tips for Parents - Grade 5

Place Value and Decimal Activities

  • Create number cubes or spinners and have the student identify the place value and value of different digits in that number.
  • Roll or pick numbers to create decimals. Add, subtract, multiply, or divide the decimals.
  • Find the batting averages or other statistics in the sports section of a newspaper and add or subtract the statistics.
  • Estimate and find the sums and differences of items at the store and in restaurants.
  • Practice basic addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts.
  • Roll or pick numbers to create decimals. Compare and order the numbers.
  • Choose a four-digit number. Multiply and divide by powers of 10 (10, 100, 1,000, etc.) by moving the decimal point left or right as appropriate.

Fraction Activities

  • Create or pick numbers to make fractions. Add, subtract, or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set.
  • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.
  • Identify the use of decimals in sporting events and in newspapers.
  • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions.
  • Practice multiplication and division facts.

Division with Fractions Activities

  • Create or pick numbers to make fractions. Add, subtract, or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Find examples of fractions around the house or neighborhood. Add, subtract, multiply, divide or simplify the fractions that you find.
  • Create numbers to use in fractions. Draw these fractions as parts of a whole or set.
  • Use measuring cups when baking or cooking.
  • Identify the use of decimals in sporting events and in newspapers.
  • Draw different shapes. Divide them into different fractions.
  • Practice multiplication and division facts.

Measurement and Data Activities

  • Make flash cards of different geometric figures and their properties.
  • Identify different plane and solid figures in your environment.
  • Find the volume of real-world objects in your home.
  • Make nets for different solid figures using graph paper. Compare nets that work to nets that do not fold correctly to make the figures.
  • Compare the estimated volume of a carton or bottle of liquid (such as 1/2 gallon juice or milk or two liter bottle of lemonade) in cubic inches or centimeters to its stated volume in ounces or milliliters.

Geometry Activities

  • Name two-dimensional figures and find examples at home.
  • Draw different polygons within a piece of triangle grid paper, or use combinations of triangles to create other polygons.
  • Make flash cards of different geometric figures and their properties.
  • Identify, describe, and different household objects as two-dimensional figures.
  • Use a compass or a computer to draw geometric figures.

Numerical Expressions and Patterns Activities

  • Make up numbers, roll numbers with dice, or find numbers (on labels) and compare them.
  • Create rules (ex. n = 3) and have your student extend the number pattern (3, 6, _ , _).
  • Create a number pattern and have your student write the rule.
  • Create an input/output machine (function table) for a given rule and have the student fill in the missing inputs and outputs.
  • Create an input/output machine (function table) for an unknown rule and have the student fill in the missing inputs and outputs and write the rule.
  • Find numbers and write them in expanded form.
  • Draw pictures and make models of numbers.
  • Practice addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts.

Computational Fluency- Important Notes for Parents and Teachers

  • Computational fluency is not fixed. Students can develop and improve their fluency through exposure, experience, and discussion.
  • Basic fact fluency supports computational fluency but frequently the two are co-developed.
  • Students are exposed to different strategies to develop flexibility and efficiency.
  • Students are not required to solve a problem with a particular strategy or multiple strategies.
  • Students should have freedom to choose the most efficient strategy for them.
  • Students should be able to explain how they found their solution. Explanations should not be required for every calculation. But these explanations are useful as fluency is developed so misunderstandings can be corrected.
  • Algorithms can be an efficient method of computation. This is especially true when numbers are large or unfriendly. Use of paper/pencil and/or algorithms is connected to the numbers being calculated and the strategies of the individual. For example, 199 + 82 may be more efficiently solved mentally by taking 1 from 82 to make a new problem 200 + 81. Other examples such as 14,325 + 9,180 may be better solved with an algorithm.
  • Read more about standard algorithms here (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..



Information for this page was generated by Howard County Public School System

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