Tips for Parents - Grade 2


Number Concepts

  • Skip count when counting groups of nickels and dimes.
  • Count in a pattern while doing a rhythmic or repeated task – stirring pancake batter, brushing hair, putting away groceries, walking.
  • Represent two digit numbers with popsicle sticks - make bundles of ten for the tens and use single sticks for the ones.
  • Roll dice to make two or three digit numbers with a partner. See who can make the larger number.
  • Add all of the digits of your house number together.
  • Compare prices of various items (gas, toys, etc) to find the lowest amount.
  • Make numbers or find numbers on labels and compare them.
  • Find or roll numbers and write them in expanded form.
  • Find or roll numbers and tell which place value each digit represents.

Number Operations

  • Roll single digit numbers and add them together.
  • Roll 2-digit or 3-digit numbers and add them together.
  • Roll two dice to make a two digit number. Subtract it from 99 or 100.
  • Add all the digits of your house number together.
  • Make a train with Legos or colored blocks. Write a number sentence for the different colors in the train.
  • Represent two digit numbers with popsicle sticks – make bundles of ten for the tens and use single sticks for the ones. Add the piles together.
  • Use small items (counters, beans, small toys) to represent number sentences. Use index cards to make +, -, <, >, and = symbols. Show a number sentence with a missing element: 7 + ___ = 12. Have your student find the missing addend.
  • Add the price of two items at a store.
  • Compare gas prices to find the lowest amount.
  • Roll a 2-digt number and subtract it from 99 or 100.
  • Start with 100 counters (beans, pennies, etc.) and roll two dice to make a 2-digit number. Subtract counters until you get to 0.
  • Give your student an addition or subtraction number sentence and ask them to make up a story problem to go with the number sentence.
  • Look for items that are in repeated sets or groups – panes in a window, pickets on a fence, sodas in a six-pack, wheels on cars or bicycles.
  • Make a physical array with counters and record on paper using symbols.

Time

  • Look at a TV guide and locate the time a favorite show starts. Have your child find that time on an analog clock.


Money

  • Look through an ad in the paper to locate an item your child would want (less than $10.00). Have your child count out that much money, then ask them to make change from a $10.00 bill.
  • Have your child pick out two or three items in an ad, then add the amounts together to see how much the items would cost altogether.
  • Give your child various amounts of money to count, using dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies.

Measurement and Data
  • Estimate the lengths of various objects around the house, such as a table, a book, a toothbrush, etc. Next, measure the same objects using a ruler with inches and centimeters to compare the estimate to the actual length.
  • Measure the four sides of a square or rectangular table using inches, and then add the four sides together to find the total length of all 4 sides.
  • Measure two different book lengths using centimeters. Compare the two lengths and determine how much longer one book is than the other.
  • Survey various family members about their favorite sport, color, ice cream flavor, or pizza topping. Create a bar graph to show the data.

Geometry
  • Look for 2-D and 3-D shapes around your house and community.
  • Compare 2-D and 3-D shapes. Look for the 2-D shapes that make up the 3-D shapes.
  • Talk about the shapes of foods that are eaten. For example, oranges are spheres.
  • Talk about the shapes of containers in stores. For example, cans are cylinders and boxes are rectangular prisms or cubes.


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